Scheduling Workflows in Fylamynt

Being tethered to your laptop all day isn't a good sign. Schedule your workflows with Fylamynt and enjoy the flexibility of automating your cloud infrastructure processes.

Prasen Shelar
May 3, 2021

In the previous blog we went over how easy it is to create workflows and you found out that workflows are triggered by alerts. But did you know that it’s also possible to schedule them as jobs?

This feature comes in handy when you need to perform repetitive tasks on a regular basis. Some ideas for jobs might include proactive health checks such as checking the health status of a virtual machine (VM). You can set up a workflow to monitor the VM and have a series of automated tasks performed based on the results. These can include deleting the VM, quarantining it or sending a notification via Slack for the SRE team to do further investigations. Another potential use for workflows could be to deploy or provision servers or create instances. These can be scheduled to be run every month or weekly based on need.

Without further ado, let’s go into all the ways you can schedule a Fylamynt workflow.

Scheduled Trigger

The Scheduled Trigger is a built-in feature of Fylamynt that lets you set up a Workflow to run at a specific interval. You can trigger workflows to run every day of the month, week or each day. Runs can also be configured based on intervals or a CRON schedule. 





Let’s walk through an example of how you would schedule the stopping and starting of AWS EC2 instances. This could be a significant amount of cost savings as you are not continuously running the meter. The workflow can be configured to perform the following steps on a list of EC2 instances:

Stop EC2

  1. Trigger time-scheduled execution to stop instances.
  2. For each instance run, describe the instance status.
  3. If an instance is not in a stopped state, pause for 30 seconds and check again.
  4. After 5 attempts, if an instance is not stopped, send a notification.
  5. If all instances are stopped, send a notification.

Start EC2

  1. Trigger time-scheduled execution to start instances.
  2. For each instance run, describe the instance status.
  3. If an instance is not in a started state, pause 30 seconds and check again.
  4. After 5 attempts, if an instance is not started, send a notification.
  5. If all instances are started, send a notification.


As you can see, you can schedule workflows to help you perform multiple tasks, just like a virtual personal assistant. Granted it can’t quite (yet) order you coffee or walk your dog, but perhaps with quarantine, performing those tasks in person is a welcome distraction from being tethered to your laptop all day. 


If you missed our blog on Creating Workflows, do check it out here.  And if you want to see this in action, sign up for our free trial.